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If you were to ask him what his favorite food is Dorian would say “sushi”

Of course, sushi

Because its expensive, because he didn’t grow up eating it, because it’s filling, but light enough for an after dinner…

sushi, of course because if a man really likes you there could be sake to go with and maybe Dorian could get carried              a way

sushishushishushi can’t say it too fast; savor the syllables on your tongue lest they trip you up

Of course sushi because it sounds like the start of some really delicious tea

                           “Sue?! She…” and you know you’re gonna be scandalized

 

on TV, rich white people eat sushi while wearing shades of beige; appropriate and clean and tasteful beige in all the designs and designers he loves.

A blanched Balenciaga! A faded Ferragamo! Who knew Hermes had a line of monotone brushed linen scarves? Rich white people on TV and their fans (like Dorian) -- that’s who.

Dorian wants to fall in love like the Sandra Bullocks, and Meg Ryans and Jennifer Annistons get to fall in love. Easy, by happenstance. Meet cute-ing and loving like holding hands on vacation in your matching beige  

                                                             So kleanklanklean

 

*If I had been assigned “boy” at birth my mother would have named me Dorian. The name Dorian may have Greek or Gaelic roots, but it is most likely the invention of Oscar Wilde who published “The Picture of Dorian Grey” in 1891. I’ve tried to read Dorian several times and only succeeded in boring the shit out of myself. What passes for hedonism to English men at the turn of the 20th century, barely registers as “fun” to this reader. But what really intrigued me was a quote I read where Oscar Wilde says of the characters in the novel “Basil Hallward is what I think I am: Lord Henry is what the world thinks me: Dorian is what I would like to be.”

Dorian is one of the two dreams my mother had for me. Dorian is what I would like to be—in other ages where gender isn’t so much a medical diagnosis (and its ensuing pathologies) but more of a chance at learning.


I wish there was more time to learn. I want to know Dorian, and treat him to sushi.